1 2 3 Previous Next

Qlik Design Blog

400 posts

Last year I blogged about our  Mobile Friendly Horizontal Bar Chart that we use in most of our mashups in the Qlik Demo Team.

 

Since then, many things have changed. For a start, if you have a mashup that uses many objects, you will see the load time to be much faster since I used d3.v4 and I have added a break point on how many bars to create, You can define if you want to show all or only the first 50.

 

I have also changed the currency. If you select the measure to be displayed as 'auto' then extension will use the custom format. You can abbreviate the measure with their respective symbol like 'B' for billions, 'T' for trillions etc and use your custom currency symbol

2017-05-24 18_04_56-Nordea Masters - CBO _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png

Another new feature is the custom text to display when there is no data. If you make a selection in the sheet and that produces no results then this text will be displayed.

2017-05-25 19_33_42-_Nordea Masters - CBO - 2017 Nordea Golfers _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png

 

Also, the tooltip is more elegant now and different from the standard Qlik Sense one. I changed it to follow the mouse instead of always aligned center at the top of the bar

2017-05-25 17_40_21-_Nordea Masters - CBO - 2017 Nordea Golfers _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png

YIANNI

 

Files

Qlik Branch

C_86UVPU0AAZQLi.jpg

First - a bit on Qonnections


Last week was my 6th Qlik Qonnections, our annual partner and user conference. As usual it was a tremendous event filled with learning, networking and of course "fun and games"...literally this time around for those whom attended.  What was in the past, a partner only event, has grown to include our valued customers for its 2nd year. Our customers, partners and analysts from all over the world came to one awesome place (Gaylord Palms in Kissimmee Florida - my home town!) to share, collaborate, communicate and witness all the great innovation each had to offer...of course including a few things from Qlik. In my humble opinion, each year Qonnections has increased in quality and content....and this one felt like the best one yet, credit goes to our amazing events team, our sponsors and of course our customers and partners! If you want to learn more about all the happenings at Qonnections 2017, I suggest you check our company blog for the daily recaps as well as Cindi Howson's latest blog on the Gartner Blog Network: Qlik Reveals More Roadmap and Vision.

 

The Qlik Analytics Platform Demo

 

While at Qonnections, along with my colleague Josh Good, we had the pleasure of presenting a session that in short, basically highlights everything available in the Qlik Analytics Platform. Qlik has so much growing goodness in one box, that it's becoming almost impossible to cover everything we can do for an organization's various needs in just one meeting. So this presentation was created to quickly show what is possible and is performed using 5 "Acts" that demonstrates our core product capabilities while connecting the full breadth of analytic use cases across a fictitious organization - using one coherent story-line. We originally used this as an internal enablement-type resource, but also realized the value it contains for our customers and partners and decided to publish it.

 

There are 2 videos in this blog, including links out to detailed specifics on each of the use cases. The first video (3 min) is basically a short summary of the 2nd video - introducing you the main concepts, but sacrifices the detailed demonstration. The 2nd video is a longer (23 min) step by step demo flow that dives in deeper into each analytic use case. I hope you find this information useful and please note I am checking on the public availability of the demonstration app used in the videos. Once approved I will post this as an attachment to this post. I am also looking into making all the resources available on our Partner Portal.

 

Enjoy!

 

Michael Tarallo (@mtarallo) | Twitter
Qlik

 

 

 

Qlik Analytics Platform Demo Highlights (short)

 

Qlik Analytics Platform Demo (long)

 

 

For more detailed information on the full range of Qlik Analytical use cases, please view this videos at the following links.

 

 

NOTE: To increase resolution or size of the video, select the YouTube logo at the bottom right of the player. You will be brought directly to YouTube where you can increase the resolution and size of the player window. Look for the 'settings' gears icon in the lower right of the player once at YouTube.

 

NOTE:  Can't see the video? Download the .mp4 to play on your machine or mobile device.

 

down-arrow-png-17.png

A few weeks ago, we got into a new project to create an interactive piece with the Canadian media, National Post. The goal was to illustrate the donations candidates of the Conservative Leadership Race received from the start of the race through March 2017. Qlik Sense was integrated with Qlik GeoAnalytics to visualize where the donations were coming from and which candidates received the most donations in each area.

 

The map below was one of our first tries, we decided to use color to illustrate the top candidate by amount collected, and by postal code.

 

1.png

 

Problem with this approach appeared obvious at a first glance, postal codes areas have an insane size variance, regions such as the northern and barely populated province of Nunavut extents thousands of square miles in just one postal code while postal areas in urban zones, such as in Toronto, span a few city blocks and are hidden in the map.

 

So, how to make Nunavut and Toronto visible and comparable?

 

We decided to apply a binning operation to our data to solve most of the issues described. Qlik GeoAnalytics has a wizard that lets you chose operation, making the process seamless. The result is a new table containing squares (or hexagons) geo-polygons.

 

6.png

 

 

Conservative.gif

 

In this new map version, readers can compare areas easily without the distortion introduced by the different postal code sizes, letting us to see what’s going on in Toronto and in Nunavut at the same time.

 

We've added some extra cool features to the resulting Qlik Mashup. I recommend you to visit it and explore it at http://news.nationalpost.com/news/qlik

 

Enjoy,

AMZ

The following is a recording from our latest Tips and Tricks Webinar.

 

 

We want to hear from you. Please leave your comments and questions in the comments section below.

 

NOTE: To increase resolution or size of the video, select the YouTube logo at the bottom right of the player. You will be brought directly to YouTube where you can increase the resolution and size of the player window. Look for the 'settings' gears icon in the lower right of the player once at YouTube.

Halyard.js is a new open source library that simplifies the Qlik Sense data load experience as it abstracts away the need to write a load script. Halyard.js includes a mixin for enigma.js for loading your halyard representation into the QIX engine. Using halyard.js and enigma.js, it’s now pretty trivial to generate a load script and create an app on the fly.

 

I built an app that uses Facebook’s API to grab user’s posts, halyard.js to generate a load script, enigma.js to create a session app and objects, and then displays a few filters and a visualization just to test out the whole flow, and it was awesome. I made a video of the results below, check it out.



I want to put this app up live so everyone can try it out because it's so cool, but I’m waiting on Facebook approval. In the meantime, you can grab the source code below and try it out on your own machine.


There’s a few steps to do that. First, download the source code and run npm install. Then go to the qapp.js file and enter session info for your Qlik Sense server in the config variable on line 8. Next, you’ll have to go to https://developers.facebook.com/ and create an app. Once your Facebook app is created, grab the App ID and enter it in the fb.js file, on line 26.

For your Facebook App to be able to authorize users, you’ll need to add a platform and app domain in the “Settings” page of the Facebook app.

It’s up to you how to host this. I’ve included a .qext file if you just want to use Qlik Sense Desktop.

 

Once you’ve done that, run npm run webpack to build the project, and it should be good to give it a go!

Happy Tuesday everyone!. You guys are going to love this one. In this edition of the Qlik Design Blog, our Emerging Technology Evangelist, David Freriks is back discussing integration between Qlik and a powerful big data unstructured search platform called Solr. Not only does David discuss an out-of-the-box approach to this integration, he takes it to the next level and touts the power of the Qlik Platform APIs.

 

Solr

 

In case you haven’t seen it – there is a super powerful unstructured search platform used within the big data ecosystem called Solr, built on the Apache Lucene search engine library. What’s great about Solr is that it can index just about anything, text, xml, JSON, PDF, Word, Excel, including almost any kind of text based data. That means you can drop just about anything into Solr and make it searchable using the power of Lucene core which powers the Solr platform.

 

So, where does Qlik fit in you may ask? Well, let’s observe what a Solr query output looks like:

 

1.png

Standard Solr query output

 

Hmmm, not very user friendly, not to mention it was somewhat slow to execute. Here is a little bit about what we’re looking at:

 

  • This data is the collective set of Enron emails from its infamous collapse in early 2000’s.
  • We’ve loaded this data set into our Cloudera cluster and indexed it using Solr.
  • Once this data was loaded and indexed we tested with a series of queries.
  • A full query on someone with a lot of references such as Ken Lay can run upwards of 15 minutes to bring back every email that contains a reference to him.

 

Imagine 10’s or 100’s of users each waiting 10-15 minutes for a single question to be answered, it clearly dilutes the effectiveness of the engine as a business tool.

 

Enter Qlik

 

Qlik has a tremendously powerful REST connector that is perfectly suited for connecting to sources such as Solr. (A great resource created by Mike Tarallo on the Qlik REST connector can be found here: Working with the Qlik REST Connector, Pagination and Multiple JSON Schemas - check it out to understand the basics of how it works and how the response data is assembled within Qlik)

 

What follows is how we are using the Qlik REST Connector to connect to Solr.

 

Qlik In-Memory Analytics with Solr

 

Now that we are armed with the Qlik REST Connector, and the appropriate Solr REST API connection parameters, we can pull the entire Enron email data set into the Qlik engine via Solr. (Refer to the Apache Solr Documentation to learn more,)

 

2.pngQlik REST Connector configuration

 

By pulling the entire data set, and loading it into Qlik, we now ensure that all users have sub-second access to all the data down to the most granular level, and thanks to our associative search technology – all the data has been indexed and correlated in-memory.  We can gain further insights by incorporating stock market data. Combining Enron’s stock performance with their emails tells an interesting story of rising email volume along with collapsing stock prices and elevating trade volumes.

 

5.png

Power of Qlik Data Visualization - Enron stock performance correlated with email volume


Using a mix of visualization techniques, we can see a pretty interesting collection of data, including the famous “deleted emails” gap on the bottom right chart.

 

Performing some additional analysis, we can drill in on the height of the crash that also correlates with the spike in email volume, followed by a rapid drop in volume.

 

7.pngDrop in trade volume

 

Making a few more selections we can dive down into a specific name, or comment to filter down the result sets further.

 

6.png Detail and specifics - name, email address

 

This associative search allows us to dive down into the details of the “TO” elements of the data set and see the metrics affiliated with those names.  We can also jump over to the final sheet of the Qlik Sense app and look at the individual emails body content filtered by our prior selections made in the application.

 

8.png

 

QIX API Powered Solr Search

 

The above approach of using Qlik in-memory to front end the Solr search engine is just one of the many ways Qlik can access unstructured data in big data systems. Let’s consider another application also using Qlik with Solr – this time with just the Qlik API’s. As a quick refresher, the Qlik engine (called QIX) is a fully API enabled engine with tremendous extensibility that allows Qlik to plug into any web based technology (like Solr). Using the awesome QlikSocial framework from the esteemed Johannes Sunden he adapted the webapp to connect to Solr on demand and build a full webapp from scratch. This is a great example of what we call Custom Analytics.

 

We start with a search box… And our name(s) of interest:

 

9.png

 

Now unlike the formatted Qlik Sense app, when a user hits the “search” bar – everything will happen dynamically on the fly using the API’s.

 

10.png

 

Qlik will dynamically generate a REST connection to Solr, create and load the requesting data into memory, and then build a web app around the data using bootstrap.js and angular.

 

11.png

 

The webapp is still using the Qlik engine, so selections and the search engine are still available – but all the charts and graphics are html and d3js charts – not Qlik. We’re just powering the app and the data interactivity with the QIX engine!

 

Summary

 

Solr is an extremely powerful unstructured search engine that can benefit from the speed and structure of Qlik analytics. It can provide a focusing lens on the core Solr search technology. That data can be consumed in a number of formats including a completely structured Qlik Sense app, or as an API powered web application without any Qlik UI components.

 

For more information, visit our demo site at cloudera.qlik.com

 

Enjoy!

 

Regards,

David Freriks (@dlfreriks) | Twitter
Emerging Technology Evangelist

A couple of years ago I wrote a blog on customizing straight tables in QlikView explaining how you can add an ad-hoc report to your QlikView app.  So, I thought I would share how you can now create a custom report in Qlik Sense using the Climber Custom Report extension.  The Climber Custom Report is an extension that can be added to your Qlik Sense app to give users the ability to create their own ad-hoc reports.  In this blog, I will show you how easy it is to add a custom report to your app using Qlik Sense Desktop.

 

  1. The first step is to download the Climber Custom Report extension from Qlik Branch, unzip it and put it in your Extensions folder (C:\Users\xxx\Documents\Qlik\Sense\Extensions).
  2. In your Qlik Sense app, create a table with all the possible dimensions and measures a user may want to see in a report and then add the table to master items.  The table may look something like this: table.png
  3. Add the Climber Custom Report extension to a sheet in your app and then you are ready to create a report.
  4. In the Visualizations drop down, select the report you just created.  All tables that are in your visualization master items will be listed in the drop down.  Once the table is selected, the dimension and measure lists will be populated with the dimensions and measures that are used in the table as seen below.dimensions and measures.png
  5. Select the dimensions and measures you would like to add to your report by clicking on them.  Your report will look something like the image below after you make some selections.  The dimensions are blue and the measures are orange.selections.png
  6. From the custom report bar above the chart, you can remove a dimension or measure by clicking the x and you can change the order of the columns by dragging and dropping the dimensions and measures into the order you would like them to appear in the report.

 

And that is it - it is that simple to add a custom report to your Qlik Sense app.  With Qlik Sense self-service, a user can create a report by dragging and dropping dimensions and measures into a table but what I like about the Climber Custom Report extension is it makes everything available to the user with a clean, professional and organized look.  Download it now and test it out for yourself.  See the extension in action in the Situational Awareness demo.  Note - the Climber Custom Report extension works in Qlik Sense 3.0 and higher and, like all extensions, are not supported by Qlik.

 

Thanks,

Jennell

Wow that's some title huh? Ooooh - "Qlik Sense Cloud Business and the Web Connectors" - sounds like the title for a fantasy adventure novel. Seriously, Denise LaForgia and I are back with a Qlik Sense Cloud Business update including some new videos to briefly introduce you to some really cool and new capabilities available in Qlik Sense Cloud Business - our new Web Connectors starting with access to data for Google Analytics, Twitter and Facebook. Take it away Denise!

 

Thanks Mike!

 

As promised in my blog last month, I’m back with more exciting updates about new features in Qlik Sense Cloud Business. Following our launch of REST Connectivity, I’m excited to announce that Facebook, Twitter and Google Analytics data sources are now also available in Qlik Sense Cloud Business under our new Web Connectors package.

 

For business users in particular, these connectors provide an easy way to bring together and analyze multiple data sources and data sets that are critical to sales, marketing, and other business initiatives. While some tools for social and sentiment analysis might allow you to analyze data from those sources individually, the power of Qlik Sense lets you associate this data about social and digital activity with other information about your customers, sales, marketing campaigns, customer service, and more.

 

Here’s an overview of the type of data each connector can return:

 

Google Analytics

The data returned includes many of the fields you’d see in the Google Analytics dashboard, such as page views, top landing pages, most visited pages, etc. You can retrieve data on any Google Analytics-enabled website.

  • Accounts: returns the accounts that the user has access to
  • DataFromQueryURI; enter a query URI on this table
  • DataFromTemplateQuery: returns a report from one of the available prebuilt queries
  • WebProfiles: returns the profiles that the user has access to
  • WebProperties: returns the web properties the user has access to

 

Watch Mike's brief video to get a general idea of how it works:

 

Community page and video download

 

 

Twitter


The content returned includes all tweets that include a hashtag or search term, and you can use Twitter query operators to pull data for more specific, detailed searches.

  • Mentions: returns up to 800 tweets for a Twitter screen name
  • Search: returns tweets based on a search term and other parameters
  • SearchAdvanced: returns tweets based on search term and other parameters and returns more columns than simple search
  • UserSearch: returns information about an account based on a named user search or topic search

 

In this video Mike shows how simple it is to get after Twitter data:

 

Community page and video download

 

Facebook Fan Pages and Groups

 

The data retrieved includes textual content (posts and comments) as well as counts of likes and shares.

 

  • Feed: returns the feed of posts (including status updates) and links published by the selected page, or by other users on the page.
  • Page: returns a single page
  • User Info: returns a single user - note - user identify / vanity id is used as the parameter

 

In the final video we close the loop on the last of the connectors by simply getting access to Facebook data:

 

Community page and video download

 

How to Get Started

 

While in your Qlik Sense Cloud Business workspace, you can set up your connections within your app by going into the data load editor and selecting the Create New Connection button. You’ll have to authenticate each connection using credentials from an account – your personal account, or one belonging to your business, group or organization. Once the connection is established, you can begin retrieving data.

 

5-2-2017 6-57-50 AM.png

 

4-28-2017 10-42-32 AM.png

 

 

We’re rolling out additional connectors in the next few weeks, so stay tuned for additional information!

 

Learn more


Of course check out the videos and for more detailed information and instructions, visit these resources:


Enjoy your day!

 

Denise LaForgia

Senior Product Marketing Manager

Qlik

 

Resources:

 

After reading Michael's wonderful post on the 3.2 features, https://community.qlik.com/blogs/qlikviewdesignblog/2017/04/04/introducing-qlik-sense-32?et=blogs.comment.created#commen…, I admit, I wanted to get into more details on each of the topics he mentioned. Even though this is impossible since there are so many goodies hidden in 3.2, I decided to focus more on the properties panel while creating custom extensions.

 

Some of these will make us retouch some of our extensions since, personally, I used workarounds like custom color in an input field as hex, inject dropdowns as html etc

 

Below I show the latest properties and at the end I attach an extension with everything working... Please note that, as the help pages suggest, some of these are "considered EXPERIMENTAL and may be subject to change or be removed in future releases."

For more details, please bookmark Qlik Sense Developer's help page

http://help.qlik.com/en-US/sense-developer/3.2/Subsystems/APIs/Content/extensions-api-reference.htm

 

SIMPLE TEXT DESCRIPTIONInteger
2017-04-28 23_07_23-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png2017-04-28 23_08_10-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png

text: {

    label:"This is a description for the properties panel (Text Component)",

    component: "text"

},

fontSize: {

    type: "integer",

    expression: "none",

    label: "Font Size (Integer)",

    defaultValue: "10",

    ref: "vars.fontSize"

},


 

INPUT TEXTBUTTON
2017-04-28 23_09_25-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png2017-04-28 23_09_40-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png

inputText: {

    type: "string",

    expression: "none",

    label: "String (Input Text)",

    defaultValue: "This is a test app to checkout custom properties",

    ref: "vars.inputText"

},

button: {

    label:"My Button (Button Component)",

    component: "button",

    action: function(data){

        alert("My visualization extension name is '"+data.visualization+"' and have id '"+data.qInfo.qId+"'.");

    }

},

 

BUTTON GROUPHeader 2
2017-04-28 23_09_54-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png2017-04-28 23_10_06-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png

weight: {

    type: "string",

    component: "buttongroup",

    label: "Font Weight (Button Group)",

    ref: "vars.weight",

    options: [{

        value: "bold",

        label: "Bold",

        tooltip: "Select for Bold text"

    }, {

        value: "normal",

        label: "Normal",

        tooltip: "Select for normal text"

    }],

    defaultValue: "normal"

},

show: {

    type: "boolean",

    label: "Show extra div? (boolean)",

    ref: "vars.show",

    defaultValue: false

},

 

COLOR PICKERDROP DOWN
2017-04-28 23_10_14-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png2017-04-28 23_10_24-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png

colorPicker: {

    label:"Background (Color-picker)",

    component: "color-picker",

    ref: "vars.color",

    type: "integer",

    defaultValue: 0

},

dropDown: {

    type: "string",

    component: "dropdown",

    label: "Select Options (dropdown)",

    ref: "vars.dropDown",

    options: [{

        value: "option1",

        label: "Option 1",

        tooltip: "Select for Option 1"

    }, {

        value: "option2",

        label: "Option 2",

        tooltip: "Select for Option 2"

    }, {

        value: "option3",

        label: "Option 3",

        tooltip: "Select for Option 3"

    }],

    defaultValue: "option2"

},

 

LINKSLIDER
2017-04-28 23_10_40-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png2017-04-28 23_10_59-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png

link: {

    label:"http://help.qlik.com/en-US/sense-developer/3.2/Subsystems/APIs/Content/ExtensionAPI/property-definition-link.htm",

    component: "link",

    url:"http://help.qlik.com/en-US/sense-developer/3.2/Subsystems/APIs/Content/ExtensionAPI/property-definition-link.htm"

},

slider: {

    type: "number",

    component: "slider",

    label: "Letter Spacing (Slider)",

    ref: "vars.slider",

    min: 1,

    max: 10,

    step: 1,

    defaultValue: 1

},

 

RANGE SLIDERSWITCH
2017-04-28 23_11_07-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png2017-04-28 23_11_14-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png

rangeSlider: {

    type: "array",

    component: "slider",

    label: "Range slider",

    ref: "vars.rangeSlider",

    min: 1,

    max: 20,

    step: 1,

    defaultValue: [8, 17]

},

switch: {

    type: "boolean",

    component: "switch",

    label: "Show Border (Switch)",

    ref: "vars.switch",

    options: [{

        value: true,

        label: "Show"

    }, {

        value: false,

        label: "Hide"

    }],

    defaultValue: false

},

 

TEXT AREAARRAYS
2017-04-28 23_11_23-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png2017-04-28 23_11_40-Helpdesk Management - Google Charts _ Sheets - Qlik Sense.png

textarea: {

    label:"Textarea",

    component: "textarea",

    rows: 7,//the amount of rows in the textarea component (default is 3)

    maxlength: 100,//will not allow more than 100 characters

    ref: "vars.textarea",

    defaultValue: "This can be your fottnote/legend to your visualizations"

},

MyList: {

    type: "array",

    ref: "listItems",

    label: "List Items",

    itemTitleRef: "label",

    allowAdd: true,

    allowRemove: true,

    allowMove: true,

    addTranslation: "Add Item",

    items: {

        label: {

            type: "string",

            ref: "label",

            label: "Label",

            expression: "none"

        },

        textarea: {

            label:"My textarea",

            component: "textarea",

            maxlength: 100,//you shouldn't write too much

            ref: "myTextarea"

        }

    }

}

 

Attached find the extension.

 

Yianni

A few days ago I stumbled upon one of those little tricks that we all love. Roland Vecera came up with a nice solution to bring minicharts to Qlik Sense. It can help us to increase app data density and make our Qlik Sense tables sexy and informative again. Don't forget to add this to your bookmarks!


example.png


In Roland's blog post you will find instructions about how to build a linear gauge, a traffic light gauge, and even whiskers minicharts (right table in the image above),


I particularly like the linear gauge, with this technique we can now simulate small bars that goes along with each one of the table dimension items. The expression used to create the linear gauge 'bar chart' is actually reusable and very simple, looks like this:


repeat('█', rangemax(rangemin( ceil(((column(1)/column(2))-1)*10),10),1) )


The expression will paint a variable number of solid blocks █ based on a given calculation that is evaluated by row. By now you should have a nice grey bar from 1 to 10 blocks.


Next (optional) step is to apply color to it. You could add color based on any criteria you want, in the chosen example Roland is using color in the same way as he use size, both display Growth.


The text color expression looks like this in the example:

 

if(expression>2, argb(255,0,150,0),

     if(expression>1, argb(255,0,200,0),

         if(expression>0.5, yellow(),lightred())))

 

Where expression will be the same expression as in Growth column (Steigerung).

 

You can read more about minichars in tables trick at QlikView + Qlik Sense Blog von Heldendaten: Qlik Sense Calendar Measures & "Minicharts" in Tabellen

 

Hope you like it.

AMZ


PS: For those of you who can't read German and/or use Google translator, please check out this community doc Creating Mini Chart in Qlik Sense tables (it also contains some hacks to make this trick even more complete)

Picture1.png

 

Good Tuesday Qlik Community! Today I have a fun and entertaining way to showcase the power of the Qlik Sense platform, its APIs and the art of the possible. But first, let me give you some background. In March, Qlik participated in the Gartner BI Bake Off (direct highlights here) - and for the 'innovation' portion of the presentation, my colleague Josh Good demonstrated a neat concept, showing what is possible with the Qlik platform and it's robust set of APIs - a Qlik Sense Bot - developed by my colleague Juan Gerado Cabeza. Since then we are getting numerous requests to see and learn more about what was shown on that day, so I have create this brief video to share some of its insights.

 

4-18-2017 7-38-28 AM.pngWhat is a Bot you may ask?

 

You already know some popular bots – Siri, Cortana, Alexa and of course Google. These guys are programs designed to perform tasks, such as setting an alarm, telling you the weather, searching online or even ordering a pizza. So why not have a bot tell you who your top sales people are, alert you when profit margin reaches 20%  – or - even have it send you charts and reports directly to your device?  The possibilities are endless. Juan as done just that, creating an analytical assistant - that in actuality turns Qlik data visualization into conversational analytics.

 

Now understand the Qlik Sense Bot - IS NOT a product provided by Qlik, but rather a neat concept that demonstrates the art of the possible when using the Qlik platform and its APIs. Now - neatness, coolness and Qlik platform superiority aside, what I like the most about this innovation is that it provides many real world applications. Bots can be used by anyone, anywhere, on any device and at anytime – scheduling automated tasks and providing access to information when and where you need it – reducing complexities, and increasing availability of insight by simply having a conversation. So in my opinion I do see this as a viable product offering, but you never know. Watch this brief video to learn more about this awesome concept. If you want even more information about this superior innovation, please contact us at qlik.com, or you can reach out to us on Twitter or on the Qlik Community.

 

Have a great day!

 

Regards,

Michael Tarallo (@mtarallo) | Twitter

 

Pushing the Boundaries of Analytics  - Qlik Sense Bot

 

We want to hear from you. Please leave your comments and questions in the comments section below.

 

NOTE: To increase resolution or size of the video, select the YouTube logo at the bottom right of the player. You will be brought directly to YouTube where you can increase the resolution and size of the player window. Look for the 'settings' gears icon in the lower right of the player once at YouTube.

 

NOTE:  Can't see the video? Download the .mp4 to play on your machine or mobile device.

 

down-arrow-png-17.png

Did you know that you can register extensions on the fly in mashups? That's right, you can register an extension in a mashup to use in that mashup, regardless of whether the extension is already loaded into your Qlik Sense environment. That means you can distribute your mashup with any extensions it uses as one package, and you have total control of the extension version your mashup is using.

 

Doing it is pretty straightforward. You just need to load the extension code into your mashup, then register it. It'll look something like this.

require(["js/qlik"], function (qlik) { //load qlik module

  require(["path-to-my-extension/my-extension.js"], function(myExtension) { //load extension entry point
   qlik.registerExtension( 'my-extension', myExtension ); //register extension
    //do stuff with extension
  });

});








Notice that I loaded the extension entry point after loading the qlik module. That's because many extensions use the qlik module, and if your extension loads the qlik module but you try to load your extension code before loading the qlik module in your mashup, you'll end up with errors. So better just to load the extension after the qlik module has been loaded in your mashup.

Once the extension has been registered you can do stuff with it, like use it with the Visualization API. An interesting use case is if you are loading objects that use an extension from an app into your mashup. The version of the extension you register with the mashup will override the extension loaded into your Qlik Sense environment, which can be really useful.

 

You can read more about it and see a few examples here Creating extensions on the fly.

denise.png
Happy Tuesday everyone! Thanks for joining me in this week’s Qlik Community Design Blog. Today I have the pleasure of introducing our newest guest blogger, Denise LaForgia. Denise is a colleague of mine in the Product Marketing group and is a Senior Product Marketing Manager focused on our cloud solutions. In this week's edition she will be covering our new REST connectivity recently made available to Qlik Sense Cloud Business subscribers. On an occasional basis, Denise will share updates on our Qlik Sense Cloud solutions. Take it away Denise.

 

Hi Everyone,

 

Welcome to this first installment of what I would like to refer as our Qlik Sense Cloud Update blog. I plan on bringing you all the news about the latest updates in Qlik Sense Cloud as well as some tips and tricks to help you get the most out of your Qlik Sense Cloud subscription. Occasionally, I might even ask Mike to embed a supplemental video to go along with the topic as we have done in this article. Please note that I will also provide continuous updates in the Qlik Sense Cloud Community Section along with the occasional appearance here. We have a lot of exciting features rolling-out, so stay tuned!

 

This week we’re excited to announce the launch of REST Connectivity in Qlik Sense Cloud Business. We know Qlik Sense Cloud Business users are eager for additional data connectivity options in order to automatically import and associate data sets from multiple sources. REST connectivity provides flexibility to a wide range of connectivity options with many of the applications you may be using in your business or project group or team.

 

So what is REST?

 

REST stands for Representational State Transfer, a modern and lightweight, secure communications protocol used to transfer data over the web. The Qlik Sense Cloud Business REST connector is designed to load data into a Qlik Sense app from a service that supports REST. It can return data in many formats such as JSON, XML, or CSV. Most web-based applications, social media channels, cloud-based CRM systems and even Google Analytics are REST-enabled, which means you can now build a connection between Qlik Sense Cloud Business and those data sources.

 

How does it work?

 

The Qlik Sense Cloud Business REST Connector can be considered a 'generic' connector, meaning it gives you the flexibility to configure a connection with any REST-enabled source you’d like to pull data from. Depending on which application you want to connect to, you can navigate to its developer area and configure that application’s settings to open up a REST connection. Visit this area in our help section to read examples on how to do that for LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Google Analytics. (included in video) Once you have the query parameters, head to the data manager or data load editor in Qlik Sense Cloud Business to complete the connection.

 

rest1.png

 

 

You can also use the REST Connector to load data files directly from public web files, such as DropBox, by simply entering the file’s URL in the REST Connector configurator.  The Qlik Sense Cloud Business REST Connector loads the data into your app and automatically parses the information into appropriate table and field structures so that it’s easily used with your application’s data model. And, you can use the scheduled refresh feature in Qlik Sense Cloud Business to ensure your data files from the REST Connector are always up to date.

 

Ready to learn more - webinars, videos:

 

Watch Mike's video below or go to the Set Up Select Sources for REST Connectivity page for more information about how to connect to different data sources – including Facebook, Twitter, and Google Analytics - using REST. Mike will also be presenting a Tips and Trick's webinar on REST Connectivity with a LIVE Q&A on May 10th at 1PMEST - you can learn more about it and register HERE.

 

Regards,

 

Denise LaForgia

Senior Product Marketing Manager

Qlik

 

 

 

 

Introduction to the Qlik Sense Cloud Business REST Connector and JSON Schemas

 

Can't see the video? Download the .mp4 to play on your machine or mobile device.

 

Additional Qlik Sense Cloud Connectivity Resources

 

How-To Guides:

 

How-To Videos:

The ability to make selections and see what data is associated is one of the powerful capabilities of Qlik Sense and QlikView.  Selections allow users to explore the data in an app and to answer their specific questions at any given time.  In this blog, I will discuss the following selection options you may find in a selection pop-up window (shown below): Clear selection, Select all, Select possible, Select alternative and Select excluded.

popup.png

Clear selection

Let’s start with the Clear selection option.  As you may expect, this will clear all selections that have been made in an app excluding locked selections.  Locked selections are selections that cannot be cleared or changed.  They are used when the user wants to protect a selection.

 

Select all

Select all will select all values in a field making them green.  If there are excluded values in the field when you select all, then they will become selected excluded – these items will remain gray but they will get a check mark next to them indicating that they are also selected.  In the image below, Dairy was selected in the Product Group field and Cheese was selected in the Product Sub Group field.  All the other values in the Product Group field are excluded and therefore gray.  Once all values are selected in the Product Group field, the excluded items stay gray but now have a check mark to indicate they are selected excluded.

select all.png

If the selection that excludes some of the values (which is Cheese in this example) is removed then they will all become selected and turn green.

 

Select possible

To explain the select possible selection, let’s first define possible values.  Possible values are values that are not selected and not excluded by a selection.  They appear with a white background.  For example, all values in a filter pane will be possible if no selections have been made.  In the image below, Dairy is selected in the Product Group field and the Product Sub Group has 5 possible values (the first 5 values in the list).  The possible values are product sub group items that are associated with the Dairy selection.

what are possible.png

If select possible is applied to the Product Sub Group, you will get the following results:

select possible.png

Select alternative

What are alternative values?  Alternative values (light gray) are values that would have been possible (white) if a selection was not made in the field.  We have already seen an example of that in the image below.  In this example, Dairy was selected first and then Cheese was selected.  Before Cheese was selected, the first five values in the Product Sub Group field were white (possible values).  After Cheese was selected, Cheese became selected (green) and the other four values became alternative (light gray).

selected dairy and cheese.png

Select excluded

Select excluded will select all the non-selected values in a field.  If Dairy is selected in the Product Group field, then select excluded will select all values that were excluded (gray) and will make them green and the Dairy selection will become an alternative value (light gray).  If Dairy (Product Group) and Cheese (Product Sub Group) were selected and select excluded was selected in the Product Sub Group field (see image below), then the selected value Cheese becomes an alternative value (light gray), the possible values become green and selected and the excluded values become selected excluded (gray with a check mark).

select excluded.png

The selection options reviewed in this blog can be used not only in filter panes and the selections tool but they can also be used in charts.  This gives the user the ability to drill down in the data and see what data is associated and excluded by selections.  Selections are very powerful so it is important to know all your options and how you can make selections to analyze your data.  The example images used in this blog are based on the data in the Consumer Goods Sales demo.  Feel free to use the selection tool in the app to test out selections or log in to qlik.com so you can add your own filter panes to the demo app.

 

Thanks,

Jennell

Well guys - it is release time again and today I am please to announce the arrival of Qlik Sense 3.2. Now if you have been using Qlik Sense Cloud since February 2017, some of these features may seem familiar to you already. Going forward we may not always roll out everything in one big bang for a dot/feature release. In fact, as we continue to build on our strength in the cloud, we are beginning to make features available in Qlik Sense Cloud on a continuous basis so there is really no need to wait for the ‘big day’ to get the latest features. So if you are eager to try out new features and capabilities in Qlik Sense, there is always a chance they could already be in Qlik Sense Cloud ahead of the Desktop and Enterprise software. So stay tuned and connected to us for the latest news.

 

In this blog I wanted to demonstrate and present what's new in Qlik Sense 3.2. As one of our community members puts it, it is "a pretty beefy dot release". To keep it plain and simple here are the highlights:

 

4-3-2017 8-01-20 PM.png

 

  • Advanced coloring
    Ability to more easily choose user defined colors for visualizations, measures, and KPI objects

 

  • Calendar measures (my favorite)
    Automatically generated fields for comparing date ranges for measures without writing Set Analysis expressions. (BTW, if you don't know what Set Analysis is, I suggest you check out this primer video:A Beginners' Introduction to Set Analysis (video) as the concepts learned can still apply to other analysis.)

 

  • GeoAnalytics
    This is technically not "in" 3.2 - but is ready to be used with it. I make mention of this in the video and you can learn more here: Introducing Qlik GeoAnalytics

  • Shared persistence
    A new installation option for Qlik Sense Enterprise when deploying multi-node sites that allows nodes access to centralized storage, improving performance and stability with larger deployments.

 

  • Supported desktop client
    Allows Qlik Sense Desktop to authenticate against a Qlik Sense Enterprise server NOW with full support by Qlik in production environments. (No Qlik Sense server? - then you must register for a QlikID and use those credentials)

 

  • Additional visualization, navigation, and search improvements

 

So, sit back and enjoy this short video that describes and demonstrates these aforementioned features in more detail. Leave your comments and feedback to below, we'd love to hear from you.

 

If you want to get Qlik Sense Desktop 3.2 today - you can get it from this temporary link Qlik Sense Desktop here - we are currently updating our Qlik Sense Desktop products page on our website. You can also experience 3.2 without downloading any software by using the Qlik Sense Cloud.

 

For additional help on these features and more check out our Qlik Help Channel on YouTube. (I don't manage this, so videos are not always available as .mp4)

 

Regards,

Michael Tarallo (@mtarallo) | Twitter

Qlik

 

 

What's New in Qlik Sense 3.2


NOTE: To increase resolution or size of the video, select the YouTube logo at the bottom right of the player. You will be brought directly to YouTube where you can increase the resolution and size of the player window. Look for the 'settings' gears icon in the lower right of the player once at YouTube.


Note: Can't see the video? Access to YouTube blocked?
Download the .mp4 file attached to this post.

                            down-arrow-png-17.png

Filter Blog

By date:
By tag: